Archive for February, 2006

02/19/06 Warrior’s Society News

In this issue:

1. Clinic and Ride with Monique “Pua” Sawicki on Saturday, February 25th

2. No same day signups to replace “Did Not Show’s” at the Pow Wow

3. A Valentines night spent in the Forest; that one couple will never forget

1. CLINIC AND RIDE WITH MONIQUE “PUA” SAWICKI ON SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25TH

Get ready for the Vision Quest with Warrior’s Society Club member Monique “Pua” Sawicki, the female 2004 and 2005 NORBA National Marathon Champion and Female 2005 NORBA 24 Hour Solo National Champion. Monique is featured in the current issue of Outside Magazine in an article about her phenomenal rise in MTB endurance racing.

The 1 1/2 hour clinic will begin at 8:30 a.m. staging out of Cooks Corner. At the clinic you will learn how to get to the next level in your racing and riding. The clinic will cover:

# Nutrition
# Training
# Clothes and Equipment

You’ll also have the opportunity to try out other products from some of Pua’s favorite companies.

Following the clinic there will be a 1 1/2 hour ride on the Luge “loop.”

www.teammata.com

info@teammata.com

2. NO SAME DAY SIGNUPS TO REPLACE “DID NOT SHOW’S” AT THE POW WOW

We have heard many reports through the grapevine that people intend to show up the morning of the Pow Wow hoping to fill the positions of participants that do not show up.

Although we did this in the past, due to the time involved in updating our scoring system we will no longer allow this to occur. No one will be allowed to replace any participant that does not show up for the event(s).

3. A VALENTINES NIGHT SPENT IN THE FOREST; THAT ONE COUPLE WILL NEVER FORGET

I received the following trail work report from John Early, who was out trimming Trabuco Trail early on Wednesday, the day after Valentines Day. He came across a couple that apparently decided to take a late hike to the “waterfall” Tuesday evening. In John’s words:

“.when climbing up to the trail work area I ran across a pair of women’s dress heels along the trail about 3/4 mile from the road end. “Odd” I thought and continued on hoping I was not going to happen upon some crime scene next.

Then later I ran across two people just below the Horse Thief junction who were very lost by their own admission. When I saw them they were just standing there not moving, kind of huddled together. They were adults in their early thirties I’d say and were dressed liked they had come from a night of partying and/or dancing. The woman was wearing a lamb’s wool shawl over a dress and was shoeless. Ouch!

They had apparently climbed all the way to the top of West Horse Thief…one of them shoeless mind you…looking for “that waterfall.”

I told them they had happened upon the right guy, because I was far from lost and knew exactly where I was. I directed them out to their car that was oddly parked, blocking the loop at the road end. When I offered to tell them where the waterfall was, they said “No thanks. We just want to get the hell out of here!”

As I walked away from them I wondered what time they had started hiking up. Last night? Or this morning after a night of excess? Neither one was a good scenario. Now I wish I would have asked them. People continue to amaze me.”

That’s one Valentines Day they’ll never forget.

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02/12/06 Warrior’s Society News

In this issue:

1. The Sierra Peak Fire – In defense of the Forest Service

2. Upper Holy Jim Trail Work rescheduled for Sunday, February 19th.

3. Our next Flying B XC Trail Building Event this Sunday, Feb. 19th

4. Clinic and Ride with Monique “Pua” Sawicki on Saturday, February 25th

1. THE SIERRA PEAK FIRE – IN DEFENSE OF THE FOREST SERVICE

I have heard much criticism of the Forest Service due to the fire that resulted from the controlled burn near Sierra Peak. I have worked closely with the Forest Service for going on 8 years and I ask that you not judge them so harshly.

Controlled burns are helpful tools in reducing fire. The greatest myth in the chaparral environment is to “just let it burn” and take no action to minimize or prevent fires. Although fire is a natural part of the chaparral environment, it is the frequency of fires that can be devastating to this environment.

Planning a prescribed burn is not something that the Forest Service rushes into or takes lightly. January and February historically have been the best months with the best conditions for fuel treatment activities. When this was planned and up to the day of the burn, post burn weather was predicted to be favorable.

Unfortunately, the weather forecast drastically changed after the prescribed burn. On Friday, February 3 at 2:00 PM, one day after the burn, the National Weather Service alerted the public to Santa Ana wind conditions. The Forest Service understandably kept personnel monitoring the area through Sunday to make sure no flare-ups occurred.

But nature had other plans; and that is why nature can be beautiful, but also deadly and unforgiving. Nature has a mind of its own despite our best efforts to use technology to “control” and predict it. The Forest Service understands the limits of technology and the fickle hand of nature but this understanding does not limit their vulnerability; they are intimately aware of this.

The area of the Sierra Peak Fire has not burned since the last major fire in 1967 (almost 40 years). As I mentioned, although fire is part of the chaparral environment, too much fire can cause great harm to the system. While it is true many chaparral plants seed need either heat, charred wood, or smoke to simulate germination, it takes years for enough seeds to accumulate in the soil to allow the chaparral to recover properly after a fire.

As I previously mentioned, the chaparral environment is only severely affected when fires occur in the same area in short time periods of 10 to 20 years. This short frequency of fires does not allow the environment to regenerate and exposes it to invasive species such as non-native grasses and artichoke thistle.

It was actually a good thing the fire burned primarily towards the west and east Anaheim. If the fire had turned southeast it would have severely affected areas around Limestone and Black Star that were burned a few years back and have not yet fully recovered/regenerated from the fire.

Most of the hot embers fell on populated areas that have landscaping or roofs that due to modern building codes are not as susceptible to fire. The toll road was one of the factors in helping to prevent the westward spread of the fire.

If the fire had burned southeast it would have dropped hot embers on vast areas of the Cleveland setting it vast areas of it on fire and threatening the communities of the canyons, Rancho Santa Margarita, Robinson Ranch, Corona and Temecula.

The area that was burned will regenerate. And since it has been almost 40 years since it has burned the habitat will regenerate with new growth.

Remember, it is not fire that is detrimental to the chaparral environment, it is the frequency of fire that is.

Many thanks to Richard Halsey of the Chaparral Institute:

www.californiachaparral.com

for his assistance in writing this commentary.

2. UPPER HOLY JIM TRAIL WORK RESCHEDULED FOR SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 19TH

Due to anticipated Red Flag conditions we were forced to cancel our trail work event scheduled for last Sunday the 12th and have rescheduled it for this Sunday the 19th.

Although this work conflicts with the work planned for the Flying B we hope to have enough volunteers to do both trail work events. We will be finishing up brushing Lower Holy Jim and stabilizing/rerouting the bottom sections of Upper Holy Jim.

We’ll be starting work at 8:00 a.m. meeting at the dirt parking area off Silverado Canyon Road at Black Star Canyon Road.

You supply gloves, water and snacks for during the work and we’ll provide the tools, as well as food and drink for when the work quits at 2:00 p.m.

Please RSVP to help insure there is enough food for everyone. Trail work volunteers will qualify to attend our end of the year Thanks/Christmas Ride on Saturday, December 2nd as well as our trail grand openings at the Flying B.

Volunteer course builders will also be invited to private pre-rides/practices on the courses to be used in our 2006 Flying B Series of Events.

Food, drink and prizes are included in these free events.

3. OUR NEXT FLYING B XC TRAIL BUILDING EVENT THIS SUNDAY, FEB. 19TH

Our XC trail course designers, Jason Martin and Eron Boyer, have laid out a killer single track with a great dual solum like section for our 2006 Event Series at the Flying B.

We need volunteers to help build this single track; you will be assisted by a small tractor. If you’re free we could use your help. All those volunteering to help build this single track will be invited to its grand opening party once it’s completed and they will also be invited to our end of the year Christmas/Thanks ride on Saturday, December 2nd. Food, drink and prizes are included in these free volunteer events.

Volunteer course builders will also be invited to private pre-rides/practices on the courses to be used in our 2006 Flying B Series of Events.

We’ll be meeting at the front gate at the Flying B Ranch at 9:00 a.m. Food and drink will be provided after the work; all you need to bring is a pair of gloves and water/snacks for during the work.

To RSVP contact Jason at:

mtnbikej@comcast.net

We plan on constructing a total of 3 new single tracks that will be a blast to race/ride on.

4. CLINIC AND RIDE WITH MONIQUE “PUA” SAWICKI ON SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25TH

Get ready for the Vision Quest with Warrior’s Society Club member Monique “Pua” Sawicki, the female 2004 and 2005 NORBA National Marathon Champion and Female 2005 NORBA 24 Hour Solo National Champion.

The 1 1/2 hour clinic will begin at 8:30 a.m. staging out of Cooks Corner. At the clinic you will learn how to get to the next level in your racing and riding. The clinic will cover:

# Nutrition
# Training
# Clothes and Equipment

You’ll also have the opportunity to try out other products from some of Pua’s favorite companies.

Following the clinic there will be a 1 1/2 hour ride on the Luge “loop.”

www.teammata.com

info@teammata.com

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02/05/06 Warrior’s Society News

In this issue:

1. Our next Public Trail Work Event, Sunday February 12th

2. Its all about Access – Article from Mountain Bike Action

3. Our next Flying B Cross-Country Trail Building Event, Sunday, Feb. 19th.

4. Bike Harvest Update

5. Your help needed for Bobcat study in our Wilderness Parks

6. Interpretive hike in Bear Canyon

1. OUR NEXT PUBLIC TRAIL WORK EVENT, SUNDAY FEBRUARY 12TH

At our next trail work event this Sunday we will be finishing up brushing Lower Holy Jim and stabilizing/rerouting the bottom sections of Upper Holy Jim.

Work left to be done:

Upper Holy Jim above the Main Divide:

Upper part was very rutted and slippery down the middle at the bottom switchbacks. We will work on improving and re-routing this section to stabilize the trail and enhance the spring where Upper Holy Jim now exits at the Main Divide and Lower Holy Jim.

Lower Holy Jim:

The upper part of the trail (that is below the spring and before the rocky sections) is brushed pretty well but will need some tread work done to keep the trail from “sliding away” down the hill.

The middle area (from the falls junction to up past the rocky sections) is in need of brushing. There are lots of sections where both sides of the trail have the brush and buckthorn encroaching on it. While it’s not bad now with two months of spring growth it will be.

The earthwork repairs and the placement of grade stabilizers on Holy Jim and Trabuco that were installed after last year’s record rains have kept the trail beds in great condition; the grade stabilizers should help prevent and trail bed scouring from this year’s rains.

We’ll be starting work at 7:30 a.m. We have not yet decided where we will be staging from; it will depend on if we can get permission to access Maple Springs Road, which is currently closed.

You supply gloves, water and snacks for during the work (and a beach chair for afterward) and we’ll provide the tools, as well as food and drink for when the work quits at 2:00 p.m.

Please RSVP to help insure there is enough food for everyone. Trail work volunteers will qualify to attend our end of the year Thanks/Christmas Ride on Saturday, December 2nd as well as our trail grand openings at the Flying B.

Volunteer course builders will also be invited to private pre-rides/practices on the courses to be used in our 2006 Flying B Series of Events.

Food, drink and prizes are included in these free events.

2. ITS ALL ABOUT ACCESS- ARTICLE FROM MOUNTAIN BIKE ACTION

The Blue Ribbon Coalition, of which we are an affiliated club, has published (with permission) an excellent article on the ongoing access battle to our public lands. Please take the time to read this very informative article:

http://www.sharetrails.org/index.cfm?page=42

3. OUR NEXT FLYING B CROSS-COUNTRY TRAIL BUILDING EVENT, SUNDAY, FEB. 19TH

Our XC trail course designers, Jason Martin and Eron Boyer, have laid out a killer single track with a great dual solum like section for our 2006 Event Series at the Flying B.

We need volunteers to help build this single track; you will be assisted by a small tractor. If you’re free we could use your help. All those volunteering to help build this single track will be invited to its grand opening party once it’s completed and they will also be invited to our end of the year Christmas/Thanks ride on Saturday, December 2nd. Food, drink and prizes are included in these free volunteer events.

Volunteer course builders will also be invited to private pre-rides/practices on the courses to be used in our 2006 Flying B Series of Events.

We’ll be meeting at the front gate at the Flying B Ranch at 9:00 a.m. Food and drink will be provided after the work; all you need to bring is a pair of gloves and water/snacks for during the work.

To RSVP contact Jason at:

mtnbikej@comcast.net

We plan on constructing a total of 3 new single tracks that will be a blast to race/ride on.

4. BIKE HARVEST UPDATE

From SHARE and Warrior’s Society member Gregg Howard:

I just wanted to bring everyone up to date on the results of the Bike Harvest that we held last Saturday. We collected over 100 bikes! We were totally blown away by the response. In fact, I’m still getting calls and emails from people that missed the collection day for one reason or the other and wanted to donate more bikes. We had approx 15 great volunteers spend their Sat washing, repairing & lubing all sizes of bikes. We ended up with two truckloads of bikes to delivery to our various charities… which three of us delivered on Monday of this week. Do you have any idea how long it takes to load 100 bikes into a truck… these were stacked 3 & 4 high!!!

Needless to say, there are a lot of very happy kids & adults now putting these bikes to good use.

Thanks to everyone who helped make the Bike Harvest a success!!!

Gregg
AKA “Old Man Riding”….yeah!

5. YOUR HELP NEEDED FOR BOBCAT STUDY IN OUR WILDERNESS PARKS

Dear Volunteers and Friends:

Researchers from USGS and Colorado State University are implementing a bobcat movement study in the greater San Joaquin Hills in Orange County in coordination with The Nature Conservancy, City of Irvine, State Parks, County Parks and the Irvine Company. The study area includes Crystal Cove State Park, Laguna Coast Wilderness Park, Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park, Upper Newport Bay and all places in between.

For this study, up to 13 bobcats will be captured and fitted with GPS collars to document fine-scale movement patterns in this fragmented natural landscape. Captured bobcats will also receive one uniquely colored ear tag for identification purposes should they be spotted on the trail by visitors, researchers, land managers or the various “camera traps” that have been placed out on the trails. This is where your assistance comes in!!

If you are out on the trail see a bobcat, please note the following:

1. Time of sighting
2. Location of sighting to nearest trail intersection
3. Whether or not the bobcat was collared
4. If collared, note the color of the collar and the ear tag, if possible

Please relay all bobcat sightings to the park ranger/land manager as soon as possible. Alternatively, you can send your sightings to TNC
(trish_smith@tnc.org) and we will forward the information on to the researchers.

Thanks for your assistance!

Trish Smith
The Nature Conservancy
trish_smith@tnc.org

6. INTERPRETIVE HIKE IN BEAR CANYON

Trabuco Ranger District and the Santa Ana Nat. History Association Invite The Public To Hike Bear Canyon

The Santa Ana Mountains Natural History Association of the Cleveland National Forest would like to invite the public to participate in the interpretive hike on the Bear Canyon Trail, Sunday, February 12, from 9am to 12pm. The hike will be an easy to moderately strenuous 2 to 4 miles. Hikers will be walking through chaparral and oak woodlands and returning by the same route.

If you would like more information on the hike or the Santa Ana Mountains
Natural History Association programs, please contact Debra Clarke,
Wilderness/Trails Manager, USDA Forest Service at (951) 736-1811 x 3227.

• Meet at the San Juan Loop Parking lot across from the Ortega Country
Store “Candy Store” at 34950 Ortega Highway, 92530. Take Ortega Highway
(74) 19 miles from Interstate 5 or 10 miles from Grand Avenue in Lake Elsinore.

• Parking fee: $5 or an Adventure Pass. Carpool!

• Participants should wear appropriate clothing (long sleeves and long
pants recommended), sturdy shoes, hat and sunscreen. Bring water and a snack. Walking sticks may be helpful for some due to uneven terrain and elevation gain. You are welcome to bring binoculars, camera, field-guide books.

Rain cancels the program.

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